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The NSF Smart Vehicle Concepts Center and the Ohio State University Use MSC Software as a Primary Resource in Simulation

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In October 2005, the National Science Foundation awarded a planning grant to The Ohio State University to develop the Smart Vehicle Concepts Center (SVC). The center was officially launched in July 2007 with support from National Science Foundation and industrial members (including national research laboratories). The mission of the SVC is to conduct basic and applied research on the characterization of smart materials, and the development of adaptive sensors, actuators and devices for application to vehicle sub-systems and components, build an unmatched base of research, engineering education, and technology transfer with emphasis on improved vehicle performance, and develop well-trained engineers and researchers. The center is directed by Professor Rajendra Singh of The Ohio State University (Website: www.SmartVehicleCenter.org, Email: singh.3@osu.edu, Tel: 614-292-9044).

MSC Software was granted the 'Invited Observer' status within the SVC in 2009 based on in-kind support (in terms of software) as well as endorsement by the SVC Industrial Advisory Board. The specialized software from MSC include: (a) The University FEA Bundle featuring MD Nastran, Patran, Marc, & Dytran; and (b) The University Motion Bundle featuring MD Adams, Adams/Car, & Easy5. This software has been particularly useful to gradate research on SVC projects #20 (Development of Interfacial Force Sensing Systems using Experimental and Computational Methods) and #32 (Critical Assessment of Active Noise and Vibration Technology for Rotorcraft Gearboxes and Airframes). In Project #20, the software was used to create a rigid body model of a vibration transfer path analysis experiment, consisting of an automotive engine, instrumented engine mounts, and automotive sub-frame. In Project #32, the software was used to determine the flexural modes of a gear-box strut configuration in order to determine where to place smart materials to control the vibration path through the struts. It is also being utilized in the early stages of SVC project #40 (Modeling and Characterization of Passive and Adaptive Bushings and Mounts). In this project, FEA models representing elastomeric bushings were created and incorporated into a simplified rigid body model of an automotive suspension. The resulting vibration simulation was tuned to experimental results to estimate the multi-dimensional stiffness matrices that represent the bushings.

Student modeling automotive suspension control arm with bushings using ADAMS (left); student modal testing automotive suspension control arm with bushings in a simplified lab experiment (right)

Fig. 1. Student modeling automotive suspension control arm with bushings using ADAMS (left); student modal testing automotive suspension control arm with bushings in a simplified lab experiment (right)

 

In addition to SVC projects, the MSC software has been a great educational tool for the members of the Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory at The Ohio State University, contributing to many educational research projects. In one such project, the software was used to understand the interaction among the movements of the braking and steering systems caused by interfacial forces at the disc-caliper interface. The contact model formulated using this software provided some insight into experimentally observed phenomena. This software has also been used in the Automotive Noise and Vibration Control course sequence where  students have investigated topics they were learning about in the classroom, such as modal analysis and how structural modifications can change how vibration and noise is transferred through a system.

Fig. 2. Simplified automotive suspension used to analyze the dynamics of suspension bushings as well as effects of interfacial forces at the disc-caliper brake interface.

Fig. 2. Simplified automotive suspension used to analyze the dynamics of suspension bushings as well as effects of interfacial forces at the disc-caliper brake interface.